The Story of Hachikō, the Akita That Waited Every Day For His Human (For 10 Years)

The story of Hachikō is an age old story. Most people learn about the loyal dog once they visit Japan and wonder why a statue of an Akita sits in the middle of the busiest intersection in the world.

Hachiko Statue

Hachikō was a Japanese Akita dog who became famous for his loyalty to his owner, Hidesaburō Ueno, a professor at the University of Tokyo. Hachikō would accompany Professor Ueno to the Shibuya train station every day and then return home to wait for him in the evenings. This routine continued for over a year until May 1925, when Professor Ueno suffered a fatal stroke at work. Hachikō continued to go to the train station every day at the same time, waiting for his owner to return.

Hachikō

Hachikō’s loyalty and devotion to his owner quickly gained the attention of the local community and the story of his daily visits to the train station became a national sensation in Japan. Hachikō became a symbol of faithfulness and was celebrated as a hero in the media.

Hachikō continued to visit the train station every day until his own death in 1935. His remains were stuffed and mounted and are now on display at the National Science Museum of Japan in Ueno, Tokyo. A bronze statue of Hachikō was also erected at the Shibuya train station, where he spent so many years waiting for his owner. The statue has since become a popular spot for tourists and locals alike to pay tribute to Hachikō’s enduring loyalty.

Hachikō
Hachikō with the Ueno family

Hachikō’s story continues to be told and celebrated in Japan and around the world, and he remains a symbol of the unbreakable bond between humans and their pets.

The Hachikō Statue In Tokyo, Japan

The Hachikō statue in Tokyo, Japan is a bronze statue that stands outside the Shibuya train station in honor of Hachikō, a Japanese Akita dog who is remembered for his loyalty to his owner, Professor Hidesaburō Ueno. Hachikō accompanied Professor Ueno to the train station every day and then returned home to wait for him in the evenings. This routine continued until Professor Ueno’s death in 1925, at which point Hachikō continued to go to the train station every day at the same time, waiting for his owner to return. Hachikō’s story became a national sensation in Japan and he became a symbol of faithfulness and devotion. The statue of Hachikō at the Shibuya train station was erected in honor of his enduring loyalty and has since become a popular spot for tourists and locals alike to pay tribute to this beloved dog.

Hachikō
Hachikō at Shibuya station, c. 1933

For another very very good boy who got his own statue, check out the story of Greyfriars Bobby, who stayed by his owner’s grave for 14 years.

More In: Dogs